Summary

Community-acquired pneumonia management in a short-stay unit: analysis of safety and efficacy

Juan Pastor A, Jacob J, Llopis Roca F, Gómez-Vaquero C, Ferré Losa C, Pérez Mas JR, Palom Rico X, Giol J, Ramón JM, Salazar Soler A, Corbella Virós X

Affiliation of the authors

Servicio de Urgencias y Unidad de Corta Estancia. Servicio de Reumatología. Servicio de Medicina Preventiva. Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat. Barcelona, Spain.

DOI

Quote

Juan Pastor A, Jacob J, Llopis Roca F, Gómez-Vaquero C, Ferré Losa C, Pérez Mas JR, et al. Community-acquired pneumonia management in a short-stay unit: analysis of safety and efficacy. Emergencias. 2011;23:175-82

Summary

Background and objective: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a highly

prevalent disease that often requires hospital admission. We aimed to assess the safety

and efficacy of treating CAP in a short-stay unit as an alternative to conventional

hospitalization.

Methods: Retrospective comparison of patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital with

a diagnosis of CAP between November 2005 and April 2007. We compared outcomes

for cases managed in the 2 locations (short-stay unit vs conventional hospital ward),

excluding patients who required intensive care. Variables and outcomes analyzed were

age, sex, Charlson index, mean weight in the diagnosis-related group, scores on the

CURB-65 criteria and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), findings of microbiology, and

readmission and mortality rates.

Results: A total of 606 patients were studied; 187 were treated in the short-stay unit and

419 were admitted to the conventional ward. The main significant differences between

the 2 groups were mean age (77.3 vs 67.9 years, respectively; P<.0001) and mean stay (3.48 vs 7.89 days; P<.0001). These differences were also reflected in the comparison between severity subgroups (by PSI). Mortality rates did not differ. Conclusions: Our experience with the short-stay unit suggests it offers a safe and effective way to manage CAP and leads to a significantly shorter hospital stay in comparison with conventional hospitalization, without increasing readmission and mortality rates.

 

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