Summary

Sex-related differences in emergency department management of acute coronary syndrome with ST elevation

Carbajosa Dalmau J, Llorens Soriano P, Diéguez Zaragoza S, Carratalá Perales JM, Díaz Dámaso J, Martínez Beloqui E, Pastor Cesteros R

Affiliation of the authors

Servicio de Urgencias, Unidad de Corta Estancia y Unidad de Hospitalización a Domicilio. Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Spain. Servicio de Urgencias, Unidad de Corta Estancia. Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valencia, Spain. Cátedra de Medi

DOI

Quote

Carbajosa Dalmau J, Llorens Soriano P, Diéguez Zaragoza S, Carratalá Perales JM, Díaz Dámaso J, Martínez Beloqui E, et al. Sex-related differences in emergency department management of acute coronary syndrome with ST elevation. Emergencias. 2011;23:87-92

Summary

Background and objective: Higher mortality rates for women with acute coronary

syndrome with ST elevation have been reported. Our aim was to analyze patient

characteristics and care provided by our emergency department both before and after

arrival at the hospital in order to detect sex-related differences in approach to care.

Patients and methods: Longitudinal, observational study of consecutive patients with

acute coronary syndrome with ST elevation attended by a general hospital emergency

department between March 2001 and June 2007. The study fell within the scope of

work carried out by the Spanish Register of Myocardial Infarction Emergencies (RESIM).

Patient characteristics, clinical variables, timing, and treatment administered before and

after arrival at the hospital were analyzed.

Results: Of the 214 cases registered, 160 (74.8%) were men. The mean (SD) age was

64.4 (12.6) years. The women were older (71.7 [10.6] years) than the men (62 [12.3]

years). Diabetes mellitus was more common in women and hypertension and smoking

more common in men. Care differed with regard to time elapsed between onset of

symptoms to arrival at the hospital (men, 240.3 minutes; women, 503.3 minutes;

P<.05), time elapsed between onset of symptoms and an electrocardiogram (ECG) (men, 240.6 minutes; women, 516.4 minutes; P<.01), and time elapsed between arrival at the hospital and an ECG (men, 6.4 minutes; women, 13 minutes; P<.01). There were no differences in type of transport used or in treatment given before or after arrival at the hospital. Conclusions: Care for women with acute coronary syndrome with ST elevation is subject to longer delays. Awareness of this may improve emergency care given to women.

 

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